UPDATE: Google DNS Versus OpenDNS

0
168

On the Google Operating System Blog they are talking about the Google Public DNS service. They bring out OpenDNS which is one of the biggest alternative DNS services. They remind users that many of the benefits of OpenDNS (web content filtering, stats, typo correction, shortcuts) are only available if you create an account with them so you can access the dashboard.Thanks go to Habitually Good for doing speed test comparisons between Google DNS and OpenDNS. He went into great detail to compare the actual speed performances between the two services. Here are some highlights:

Google Dns vs OpenDNS: Image courtesy Habitually Good Blog

Google was faster 52% of the time.

Now a lot of you will stop reading right there and say “Well that settles it, I’m using Google” because really what most of us are interested in is speed right? Well, there’s a couple of other things to look at. Like consistency. Notice the spikes.

He starts getting into Standards Deviation and Consistency of Data which is really cool and interesting. Plus, he was nice enough to boil it down to this:

With the complete measurements, the Standard Deviation of Google was about 3 times that of OpenDNS, and even with the spikes removes, the standard deviation of Google was twice that of OpenDNS. Which means that OpenDNS on the whole is more consistent in its operation.

This means that when Google is deviating on the faster side, it will be much faster than OpenDNS, but when it deviates on the slower side, it will be much slower than OpenDNS (on average).

And a final word of advice. Google has more money then you or I would know what to do with. It’s only going to get stronger. Of course, people said the same thing about Microsoft at one time. The Google DNS service will get better with time I imagine or so do many other people. Does this mean OpenDNS is in trouble? Not if they continue to innovate. But innovate they must in order to compete.

Finally, to those of you out there who are bothered by the typo correction service that some people keep bringing up. If you type a domain that doesn’t exist (not one of the bazillion misspelled domains that somebody owns and parks ads on) you’ll get an OpenDNS page (which is very clearly marked OpenDNS) with a search box and some ads. If you want to see what it looks like click here. I don’t know who provides the search technology for it. The only time you’ll see this page is if you type a domain name that doesn’t exist. You can then use their search box or your search engine of choice. If you type a misspelled domain that somebody bought to put ads on – groogle.com for example – then you’ll get that ad spammers page. You are under no obligation to use it.

It all comes down to personal preference. You can use who you want and that’s the great thing about living today. You can use your tired old ISP’s DNS which does nothing but the basics. Or, you can use somebody else. It’s a wonderful thing. You have choice! And that is what is important.

To see my prior post in regards to Google DNS versus OpenDNS click here.

1 COMMENT

  1. I tried Google Public DNS and its fastMy report shows almost 50% less latency but when I changed name server for one of domainit took time to reflect that changes on my local PC and as soon as I changed it to Open DNS I can see name server change

  2. I tried Google Public DNS and its fastMy report shows almost 50% less latency but when I changed name server for one of domainit took time to reflect that changes on my local PC and as soon as I changed it to Open DNS I can see name server change