My Experiment with #NSFW Links and Social Media

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Yesterday, many of you may have noticed this on my timeline:

My 13yr old sister’s costume is way too revealing. http://l.jshultz.co/16GyQ2q #NSFW

Those of you who know me know that I don’t have a 13 year old sister (that I’m aware of). So, what to think of this post? I shared it on Twitter, Facebook and Google+. It’s clearly tagged #NSFW. It alludes to what may be underage porn. If you were to see this in someone’s timeline it would be an extremely risky click. It could lead to your social media account being hijacked, possibly your computer or browser being infected with a virus, or worse.

So, how many people clicked on it? I’m glad you asked that! As of just a few minutes ago 55 people clicked on it. In fact, there was a couple of clicks just in the past hour and one poor soul between 5 and 6 am.

Screen Shot 2013-10-29 at 8.02.00 AM

The United States, as you might expect, had the highest percentage of clicks with 82% followed by the UK, Canada, Bulgaria, France on unknown.

Screen Shot 2013-10-29 at 8.03.49 AM

What was interesting to me was the social media breakdown. I have a large number of followers on all the networks, but Facebook still led the pack with 31 clicks, followed by 14 on Twitter, 3 on Google+, and 7 by people who emailed the link to their friends. What this tells me is that due to Facebook’s more personal nature, people were more apt to click on the link as opposed to the transient nature of Twitter and to a lesser extent Google+.

Screen Shot 2013-10-29 at 8.07.19 AM

Now, obviously, you shouldn’t click on links like that. It’s quite often, like I said, a scam or virus. It’s extremely dangerous. Not to mention the context of the link tells you that it’s quite possibly awful content on the other side.

What was on the other side of that link, you ask? Well, if you haven’t clicked on it already I’ll show you.

To Catch A Predator

So, now illegal porn, no viruses, just Chris Hansen of “To Catch A Predator.”