From Matt Cutts of Google: Facebook/Twitter do not affect search ranking.

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Google’s head of search spam, Matt Cutts, released a video today answering the question, “are Facebook and Twitter signals part of the ranking algorithm?” The short answer was no.
Matt said that Google does not give any special treatment to Facebook or Twitter pages. They are in fact, currently, treated like any other page, according to Matt Cutts.

10 COMMENTS

  1. No offense, but you have a strange definition of evil.
    Seriously, making the user experience 10 times better at the cost of breaking some analytics programs makes them evil?

    • I didn’t accuse them of being evil. I just asked a question. I believe in the free market system. It’s their website, they can do what they want.
      Some are calling this action evil. I’m just trying to dialog and get people’s opinion.

    • I didn’t accuse them of being evil. I just asked a question. I believe in the free market system. It’s their website, they can do what they want.
      Some are calling this action evil. I’m just trying to dialog and get people’s opinion.

  2. No offense, but you have a strange definition of evil.
    Seriously, making the user experience 10 times better at the cost of breaking some analytics programs makes them evil?

  3. What exactly is the point of doing something like this beyond deviating from web standards? I know nothing of AJAX that would require such a change. In fact, the only reason I can surmise would be reason to do this would be to hide the query on purpose. If that is the case, then I would have to rub my chin with a quizzical look on my face and for the first time ponder if indeed google is acting in an evil fashion.
    I’d also now want to test that HTTP_REFERER actually drops all parts of the query string after the pound sign, otherwise it’s still parseable even if it would cause existing analytical software to choke.

  4. What exactly is the point of doing something like this beyond deviating from web standards? I know nothing of AJAX that would require such a change. In fact, the only reason I can surmise would be reason to do this would be to hide the query on purpose. If that is the case, then I would have to rub my chin with a quizzical look on my face and for the first time ponder if indeed google is acting in an evil fashion.
    I’d also now want to test that HTTP_REFERER actually drops all parts of the query string after the pound sign, otherwise it’s still parseable even if it would cause existing analytical software to choke.

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